Best payday you get bad about online cash Ease And Convenience Of The Fast Cash Network Ease And Convenience Of The Fast Cash Network payday at any personal needs.

Posts Tagged ‘Yahoo’

Personal Brand and Creativity

May 14th, 2010

I was interviewed by Dan Schawbel, author of Me 2.0, on his website this week on the topic of Personal Branding and Creativity.  It got me thinking about the nature of creativity and personal brands on the internet.

In the early days of Yahoo, when I took over marketing and sales, it was clear that the BRAND at the company was both the name/identify of “Y-A-H-O-O” as well as the personalities of Dave Filo and Jerry Yang.  So, our earliest marketing at Yahoo was not expensive television commercials or , it was simple public relations aimed at the top US consumer reads – so with minimal marketing spend we ended up with stories on Filo & Yang in Rolling Stones, People, NY Times, Wired, and more.  All within 6 months of funding and officially launching the company.

In 1996, when I formed Interactive Minds, one could already see the power of Personalities (aka personal branding) on the Web. I teamed up with Howard Rheingold to form a company called Electric Minds.  Electric Minds was initially funded by private angels and Softbank Ventures, but did not survive…we failed to find a business model that would work in that period of the Internet – and our cost structure to produce an early community site was insurmountable.  However, it was an extremely creative endeavor – putting together PERSONAL BRANDS from a variety of technology experts that Howard knew and positioning them as global experts in their field of expertise, then surrounding them with many early social elements.  In a funny way, Electric Minds was an early pre-curser to Social Media market -but was the example of a company TOO EARLY to take advantage of the explosion.  Timing is everything.
Several months after Electric Minds came along, another early community company called The Mining Company, founded by former CEO of Prodigy Networks (@kurnit) came along.  They changed their name to About.com, went public in the dotcom bubble period and today are one of the few pre-bubble community companies still running strong.  About.com took the approach of giving thought leaders for thousands of areas (dogs, boating, stamp collecting) a “voice” and a set of tools for building community.

This is the first example I can think of where personal branding occurred on the Internet with NON-POP CULTURE people/experts and elevated them to Internet notoriety.

In the following years, personal branding has come into vogue in many ways.  First, there as the “Internet Pioneer” – Howard Rheingold is a great example of this. He was followed by Jim Cramer, The Motley Fool, Matt Drudge and Perez Hilton.

Next came the waves of famous Bloggers…..and the age of Youtube celebrities, some of whom, like LonelyGirl15 were not even real…

Now we have Twitterati. 5 Million followers and counting for @aplusk (AshtonKutcher). Byte-sized personal branding at your service.

With each wave of personalities that come to the Internet, they carry their own unique form of creativity – in “voice”/personality, style, and antics.  No one quite communicated like Howard Rheingold (or dresses like him), no one quite had the style of Arianna Huffington, no one has the short-form entertainment appeal of Violet Blue or the techno-social grace of Michael Arrington.

The latest wave of online personalities that are growing include those who are able to capture the heart and spirit of the millenials in several new areas: social consciousness, global savvy, and celebrity.  One great way to watch the celebrity arena is Celebrifi , by Blue Buzz Networks, which I’m mentoring.

Keep a watch for these areas.

See the interview at : http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/personal-branding-interview-randy-haykin/

I’m now thinking about what comes next. :)

Marketing Innovation – Part I

December 5th, 2009

Disruptive technologies, and a shift in the ways consumers and business purchase are the culprits behind a massive shift in the world of marketing in the past decade. This shift continues today, as innovations in advertising, direct marketing, public relations, promotions, channel marketing, product marketing, branding, market research, and other areas. I will cover each of these areas in a series of blogs: Part I, II, III, etc….until we get it all covered!

The entire Internet Advertising Space may be $1B in size…Let’s Go Celebrate!

As Yahoo’s original VP Marketing & Sales, I played a role in the beginning of this shift. In 1995, as Yahoo was being founded, we had to consider the Internet as a new medium for advertisers, forge a sales pitch that would convince yahoo_logolarge advertisers to “test out” banner advertising and key-word searches as legitimate ways to market their message. Fortunately, a few pioneers like Citbank, Worlds Inc. and Softbank believed us – and within a year hundreds of advertisers joined the fray. .. But the market researchers at the time thought that ad revenues might shift to Internet to $1B within 5 years – eureka! (?yahoo!?) – we were off to the gold mines, but only a fraction of the world’s marketing was anticipated to shift to online.

OK..well, maybe the entire Online Marketing  Space will be $3-5B in size…

Again, in 1996, working with Bill Gross at IdeaLab,  I brought together a business development and marketing team to assist in the founding of Goto.com (later to become Overture).  Yahoo and Excite were already public by this point, yet the face of marketing was only beginning to change.  The shift to online spending by large advertisers had only just goto_logobegun…but the idea of a SEARCH as a driving force had caught our attention, and the idea of “pay for position”/auction advertising seemed increase our potential revenues, so we tested our ideas…within 15 months Overture went public. ….But the market researchers at the time thought that ad revenues might shift to Internet to $3B within 5 years – wow!  (it was only anticipated to be a partial shift).

Online Marketing is now $45B+ globally and growing fast…

But take a look at recent articles on the online advertising/marketing space and we see that 15 years later it has bloomed into a $45M (2008) market.

Technologies that we now know to be the culprit in this dramatic shift (and some funky examples that you might enjoy checking out over the ‘Net):

  • Social media – The hottest new area of innovation in marketing today is SMM  – social media marketing.  Way way back in 2000, we used to call this “viral marketing”, until actual platforms like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter allowed us to direct eyeballs (well, call them “Followers”) to almost any type of event, brand, or product you can think of.
  • Broadband into the home & workplace – why are my children no longer crowding me out of my rightful spot in front of the family-room television? Because they don’t need to compete with me anymore – thanks to broadband into the home (which I use to watch digital TV advertisements over ), my kids are upstairs in their bedrooms snapping up Coke commercials as they watch their favorite tv shows and movies on Hulu.
  • Digital Video - my favoriteexample,  Where The Hell Is Matt (sponsored by Stride Gum), with 25 million views on Google’s YouTube exemplifies how companies can virally spread their brand or product/services thanks to advances in digital video

Marketing – one tough career ?

The huge variety of technologies that have enabled Innovative Marketing are causing a lot of trouble on Madison Avenue and in boardrooms all over the world…and the job of Marketing has become, actually quite complex, today, because there is no way to compare the impact of one’s branding, direct marketing, advertising, or social media marketing efforts.

In future blogs, my plan is to lay out some of the best resources on the Web for Innovative Marketing, and share examples and trends in each of the major marketing areas.

But, first, I leave you with one a favorite Marketing Innovation, discovered by one of my students at Berkeley (thank you, Joan).  I love this one because it takes advantage of digital video, social media, and plain old smart branding.

Freedom to Fail – Part 1

September 23rd, 2009

This past month, I was struck by something that Vinod Khosla brought up at the Haas School while accepting a “Lifetime Achievement” award, and have been turning it over in my mind many times… Khosla is responsible for major successes at Daisy Systems, Sun Microsystems, huge portfolio wins at Kleiner Perkins (KPCB) over the years, and is now responsible for at $1+ billion new fund at Khosla Ventures. What would you guess contributed most to his success: an eye for technology? Luck? Choosing the right teams?

Khosla’s secret to success

When asked what most contributed to his success over the years, Vinod boils it down to this: the Freedom to Fail. According to Khosla and many others, if we feel that we have the freedom & ability to push ourselves to the limit, create new ideas, and start companies we believe in – we are more likely to succeed. An entrepreneur who allows FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt) to creep in about his/her abilities and leadership, and fears failure is more likely to fail. More on this in a video of Vinod from SDForum awards 2 months prior.

Lessons from Early Yahoo

As part of the original Yahoo team, I observed this first-hand. There as a general feeling among the team that “hey, if this doesn’t quite go the way we imagined, we’ll fix it and try something else.”  If the worldwide web (or Yahoo)  didn’t quite take off, some of us would  just go back to their happy lives as grad students at Stanford and continue on.   Of course that didnt’ happen.  And, it was later on, after the company tasted big success that fear of failure crept in.

So, I have been wondering: what’s the link between “freedom to fail” and creativity in a start-up?  Do most successful entrepreneurial environments include this element? Is Freedom to fail learned or are some of us born with a certain “chutspah” that keeps us from thinking about failure? Can an entrepreneur deliberately set up a “Freedom to Fail” culture?  (More next post –>)